Trigger Thumb/ Trigger Finger

Trigger digits are common in the adult population.  It can be called different things including stenosing tenosynovitis but we really do not understand who gets it and why they get it.  The only population that seems to get trigger fingers more than everyone else are diabetics.  Adults with trigger finger (and it really can be […]

Mild Camptodactyly

Camptodactyly comes in different types based on age and severity.  I have written several times about camptodactyly including https://congenitalhand.wustl.edu/2012/03/camptodactyly.html While there are different ways to consider camptodactyly, there are three basic types: infantile, adolescent, and camptodactyly associated with a syndrome (i.e., athrogryposis, etc.).  For most patients, camptodactyly affects the small fingers on both sides but may […]

Partial Syndactyly

I have written several times on syndactyly, most recently about an unusual case of thumb- index syndactyly https://congenitalhand.wustl.edu/2013/08/thumb-index-syndactyly.html I have also mentioned (but not discussed in great detail) partial syndactyly.  Partial syndactyly means that the fingers are joined together by a skin bridge without bony connection.  The skin bridge does NOT travel all the way to the […]

Thumb Index Syndactyly

I have posted a number of times about syndactyly.  The two basic posts include:https://congenitalhand.wustl.edu/2011/06/syndactyly.html and https://congenitalhand.wustl.edu/2011/07/frequently-asked-questions-about.html The long and ring finger are most commonly involved in syndactyly whereas the thumb and index finger are uncommonly conjoined.  There are several important points to consider regarding thumb and index finger syndactyly: 1) The syndactyly between the thumb and index […]